Tuesday, June 5, 2007

poetry: Down to Earth


Do I believe in God? Or do I believe in the power of ‘God’?


The construction of a superpower, of an ultimate judge, suggests that we are mere flakes in the snow. Our unique designs and distinct pathways to earth have been orchestrated by a greater being; our fates, sealed, as we melt under the guise of His faithful sun. It is God, not persons, who transcribe successes and failures into the play called Life.

We do not teach ourselves how to stand on our own two feet. Family, neighbours, and, the all-knowing Lord guide and enable us. I am reminded of the anonymous poem entitled Footsteps in the Sand
(http://www.judyn.trest.com/footsteps.html) in which God affirms that “During your times of trial and suffering, when you see only one set of footprints, it was then that I carried you.”

Religious traditions are cleverly equipped with the verses and caveats to humble a people; to discourage persons from mounting a high horse and galloping into the diluted distance of self-importance. Neverminding the innumerous historical and ongoing examples of religiously-wrought egoism, such as the Divinely appointed Kings of England and Emperors of the Mughal Dynasty, I do believe that religion can foster humility.

Do I believe in God? Or do I believe in the power of ‘God’? I ask you…

10 comments:

Melody said...

I believe in both :)

jack_sparrow said...

just out of curiosity, have you ever read anything by Richard Dawkins?

My name is Rahul Mediratta. said...

hey jack_sparrow. i am familiar with richard dawkins and have watched a few of his lectures on youtube. i really enjoy his work.

whats your take on his secular stance?

Shimizu said...

I believe the idea of "God," as a social movement perhaps, as an aspect of society that differs from people to people, culture to culture. I think it is a good influence; it gives people hope, provides a moral compass, and while there are so many atrocities done in the name of (whichever) "God,", I am an idealist and believe that the good outweighs the bad.

Sometimes, I envy those to whom belief comes so easily for the fullness and support they get from having a strong faith. I myself do not believe in any sort of supreme being, however to those who have found a friend when they needed a friend; and love when they needed love, I can't deny them their fulfillment.

So I would say I believe in the power of a "God," or more precisely, in the power of religion to affect, for better or ill, the behavior and morality and character of people. It is a tremendous power; but it is one that is derived from man, (and our empowering of an idea), not from the divine.

My name is Rahul Mediratta. said...

Shimizu,

your thoughts are very well received (by myself, atleast). The 'power' and awe of God is (from our perspectives) human-made.

I share your ironic sentiment with respect to belief and faith. At times I also wish that I held irreverant and unquestioning faith in a person...a thing...a power...a truth. But I conclude that for some individuals, such naivity not only comes naturally but is of necessity (and, as you point out, makes for a 'good' presence of God). I appeal to the countless examples of black American prisoners who leave their cells with the name of Allah on their lips. Islam provides the discipline that was otherwise lacking in these persons' lives.

I personally do not need a text nor unwavering faith in Divinity to be civil and moral. Human experience and interactions taught and continues to teach me these lessons. Others, however, many others, do need a 'Life for Dummies'. And I have no qualms with that.

Shimizu said...

"Life for Dummies"
What an excellent way to put it!
><

*amused*

Anonymous said...

I am a York graduate myself. I have just finished reading your story about your reward scholorship and I gave me shivers. Fristly, I would like to say congratulations and I wish you the best this year. Secondly, it brightend my day knowing that the universe is truely assists you when you are a person who is working hard and giving back to humanity. I am going through a similar waiting period and I have to believe when you want something bad enough and its in the cards some way, some how one can achive it.
Best wishes

Fellow Graduate

Anonymous said...

I am a York graduate myself. I have just finished reading your story about your reward scholorship and I gave me shivers. Fristly, I would like to say congratulations and I wish you the best this year. Secondly, it brightend my day knowing that the universe is truely assists you when you are a person who is working hard and giving back to humanity. I am going through a similar waiting period and I have to believe when you want something bad enough and its in the cards some way, some how one can achive it.
Best wishes

Fellow Graduate

verz said...

Rahul,

Have you ever read any of the texts which you term as 'Life for Dummies'??

I am disturbed by your use of such harsh words to what millions of people regard as Divine texts.

You may or may not view them as Divine texts, that is not of my concern. To each his own.

BUT, if in one post you can comment on someone who uses the term 'Jews' rather than 'Israelis', telling him to 'open his mind and heart' https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=2809325554126320351&postID=2243765361550177351

then... in the same vein, should you not be opening your own heart to the millions of people who bow their heads in humility day after day, to a God most only know through a Prophet who was sent to reveal God's message through such a text?

"Christian, Jew, Muslim, shaman, Zoroastrian, stone, ground, mountain, river, each has a secret way of being with the mystery, unique and not to be judged."

- Jalal al-Din Rumi, 12th century Sufi Mystic

Anonymous said...

God is a word. A representation of an idea brought to us by fascination. We, as humans, are constantly fascinated with what we learn as we grow older. Each day holds some untold story, or hidden knowledge about our surroundings that on the previous day we would have never noticed. By learning something new, we are constantly adding knowledge which can now be tought to other humans with our "personality" or "character" as a medium. How one presents what they have learned is a definition of ones behavioural characteristics. These characteristics, however different they are, are not individual at all. They are a byproduct of that individuals knowledge of their surroundings, and the good or bad feelings and or consequences that surround our actions. It is also fair to say that as humans, we are allowed/meant to have plenty of admiration for our "mentors" or people we wish to be like. It is then fair to say that "acting" or behaving like these other people is completely normal, and the times at which one chooses to copy someones behaviour can then define that persons unique character. Even though we have physical identities, our human will to learn and teach is innate in all of us, from the brain surgeons to the heroin addicts. Every human out there gets fascinated by the experience we call "life". To furthur complicate the situation ones incredible reasoning skills and logic must live with ones ego. This "ego" is what keeps the "story of life" important and worth working for, or makes it sad and worth dying over. The "ego" is the force that battles the logic and reasoning we so confidently acknowledge as "right". The ego, through the unconscious mind, transcends logic and causes unexplainable feelings. As non-scientific as it sounds, sometimes being successful in this "life" is about following those butterflies in your gut when you have a good or bad feeling about something. These butterflies, as confusing and weird as they might be, are often the feeling most easily imagined when the "power" or "force" of either "God" or "The Devil" are giving you. It seems the word God, as symbolized through religion can be described more as a mythological hero, the "Creator" who fights the "destroyer"/"The Devil" in epic battles of morality within the human race. Our existence is based on questions and answers, and it is our fascination with life that leads to our questions, not our understanding of God. Lets now hypothesize A human race with no voice. We are capable of everything else we can do, but without words. Using this scenario, there is no question "Is there a God?" Simply a brilliant experience riddled with adventure. Every day can hold a different obstacle, one that must be overcome, and one that can only be done by a human, as we are the ones who are responsible for our role on this Earth. This responsibility to serve ourselves and others, with words or without is absolutely essential for our survival. We enjoy striving, achieving, succeeding, helping and prospering. What are we really achieving when answering the question "Is there a God?". As is known , religions, for the purpose of population control, force the importance of this question, and then provide and amazing story-filled answer that even the kids can enjoy. The problem with this question is the importance humans will place on finding the answer. The one explanation that could answer the question "why?". Why are we experiencing anything at all? My personal belief is that even if someone gave me a ten thousand page description with the most amazing,comprehensive, and scientific answer about why we are here, my life would not change in the least. For anything we learn here as humans is limited to our capabilities, and even learning or understanding the full creation of the universe, should not take away from the enjoyment of eating a fresh piece of fruit on a hot day, or flossing a piece of corn out of your teeth that has been there for hours :) It is my belief that to move forward as a race and to stop war, we must recognize our similarities, and observe our differences as less important. We all do the same stuff pretty much, with different skin colours and different clothes. Not to take away from cultural differences, they are very interesting indeed, but they should not divide us.