Monday, November 18, 2013

Normalization of India-Pakistan relations

Left: Jinnah-wali selfie Right: Nehru-wali selfie
The window is upon us to normalize India-Pakistan relations.  Google’s Reunion video – in which a Baldev of New Delhi is reunited with his childhood friend, Yusuf of Lahore – is indicative that the opportunity is ripe for more peace and less war in South Asia.  Even well before Google, Coca-cola’s finger was already on the Indo-Pak pulse.  They installed vending machines that enabled Indians to use video technology to converse with Pakistanis – new connections beget new relations?




My own doctoral research investigates this turn in Indo-Pak relations, particularly in the economic realm.  The interest to normalize Indo-Pak trade is strong and the sentiment is real.  I have especially felt as much these past few months during the numerous meetings and roundtables I have attended on this subject with representatives from government, industry, academia, and the media, to name a few. 

Roundtable by the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER) with former Commerce Secretaries of India (Rahul Khullar) and Pakistan (Zafar Mahmood), on November 7, 2013
 
Roundtable by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) with the Federation of Pakistani Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FPCCI) with both Presidents, on November 13, 2013
Recent news clippings report that young business leaders from both countries have been organizing delegations (see The Hindu: CII Young Indians to develop Indo-Pak trade ), and the President of Pakistan's Chamber of Commerce and Industry indicates that trade will flourish regardless of whether India elects a Hindu-nationalist Modi or a secular Gandhi (see Business Standard: Modi's rise to power will not affect India-Pakistan trade relations: Zubair Ahmed Malik ).  History's first Indo-Pakistan joint venture has been incorporated legally, between two furniture companies in Amritsar and Lahore (see International The News: Pakistan, India launch joint venture ).These firms will join others from India and Pakistan at an upcoming Punjab International Trade Expo see Amritsar (see biz trade shows ).

I close by reciting Mahatma Gandhi-ji’s emblematic call to tolerance and love: Ishvar Allah tero naam!  This mantra calls for God to love us all, regardless of whether we each assign God with some different name, be it Ishvar, Allah, or Baghwaan (or Jesus, Yahweh, or Buddha, and so on).  I melt every time I hear this in song and poetry.    


plaque in Amritsar, Punjab, India which recites the mantra 'Ishvar, Allah tero naam!'


khaadi chic -- Delhi men's street fashion, Fall Winter



Men’s street fashion in New Delhi blooms during Fall and Winter.  Delhite men envelope the city with rich textures of handspun textiles referred to as khaadi, such as raw varieties of cotton, cotton-silk, and linen.  These fabrics are layered through vests atop long-sleeved shirts which are then nestled among mufflers and stoles.  Uncle-jis are the most adventurous with their knit cardigans in gaudy colors like rose and mustard.  

Four pieces stand out for their smart look, classic style, comfort, and versatility: i) the Nehru vest; ii) the Nehru jerkin; iii) the kurta pant; and, iv) khaadi neckwear.  I combine these separates with numerous other odds and ends in my wardrobe.  I label my final look as khaadi chic since my execution is monochromatic and minimalist, with an emphasis on layers and texture. 

I have never blogged about fashion, and so the inspiration for this posting comes from a friend whose blog on saris is also outside her own vocation as a novelist -- The Sari-Torialist by Piyali Bhattacharya 

Where can you find these pieces in New Delhi? How should you size and wear them? And how have I faired?  
 

khaadi


In South Asia, handspun fabrics are referred to as khaadi.  My love for khaadi is aesthetic and also political, historical, philosophical.  Aesthetically, khaadi has a grainy texture which showcases in raw beauty the anatomy of textile.  Politically, historically, and philosophically, khaadi was that concept fundamental to Mahatma Gandhi’s independence movement.  It emphasized sovereignty via economic self-sufficiency, delivered political freedom to India and her people and thus to me, and became the basis for fairer-trade for producers and particularly for those in rural India.  The eternal symbolic image of khaadi is of course Gandhi’s spinning wheel.


Nehru vest


“The Nehru jacket is a hip-length tailored coat for men or women, with a mandarin collar, and with its front modeled on the South Asian achkan or sherwani, an apparel worn by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, the Prime Minister of India from 1947 to 1964.” (Wikipedia: Nehru jacket). 

  • Where to buy your Nehru vest?

Fashion no: Ready-made Nehru vests at khaadi establishments, such as the state emporiums on Janpath, Dilli Haat, and Fab India – gahhhh no!  Unless you are a plump uncle-ji then you will find yourself swimming in these vests. And it always strikes me as terribly tragic since the textiles in these shops have luscious raw texture and brilliant color.


Fashion yes: Ready-mades from men’s tailor shops like Raymond, Gujralsons, Manyavar, and so on.  Karol Bagh market has a high concentration of such shops.  After my shopping achievements I reward myself with delicious chaat items at Roshan di Kulfi – forever, for always.  Or, purchase fabric from one of the khaadi establishments aforementioned and have it tailored. I’ve exhausted both options.  
  • How to size and wear your Nehru vest?

Fashion no: Your actual size – gahhhh no!  Since Nehru vests are sleeveless, then wearing your actual size will result in a shoulder that juts out and looks instantly uncool.


Fashion yes: One size down from your actual size. I am a 40 and so I wear a 38.  Pair your Nehru vest with a shirt that is your actual size. Since I am a 40 then I wear a 40 shirt with my 38 Nehru vest. Similar to how a dress shirt fills in the empty space between a suit blazer and your torso, the same needs to happen for Nehru vests since these also leave space between your torso and the vest itself.  The collar on your shirt can be a Western collar, though I think the Mandarin collar makes for a much better match. I enjoy wearing short-sleeved shirts, but longer-sleeved can also look bad-ass.   

winter white

Shirt is cotton khaadi with shear stripes in white purchased from Handloom House at Galleria Market, DLF Phase 4, Gurgaon; Nehru vest is custom-tailored using khaadi raw silk in ivory purchased from Khaadi Emporium at Connaught Place, New Delhi; Pants are Emerson chinos purchased from Banana Republic on Magnificent Mile, Chicago; Toque is custom-knitted from wool in ivory from my beautiful aunt in Janak Puri, New Delhi; Watch is solid black face and leather strap by Nixon brand purchased from Simon’s, Montreal; Loafers are black leather by Bata brand purchased from the Atrium Mall, Karachi


bada smart

Shirt is cotton khaadi in white with thin burgundy stripes purchased from Handloom House at Galleria Market in DLF Phase 4, Gurgaon; Nehru vest is khaadi wool in burgundy by Raymond brand purchased from Himachal Bhawan in Mandi House, New Delhi; Pants are same as above; Watch is same as above; Sandals are Greek-style in black leather by Rudsak brand purchased in Toronto


khipster 
(khaadi + hipster)

Shirts are cotton khaadi purchased from Dilli Haat at INA, New Delhi; Nehru vest is wool in black purchased from Redtape in Karol Bagh Market, New Delhi; Toques are wool purchased from Target in Chicago; Pants are denim jeans in indigo by Levi’s brand purchased from Himachal Bhavan in Mandi House, New Delhi; Necklace is a blow whistle in brass from Crossroads Trading Co. in Wicker Park, Chicago


 Nehru jerkin


This vest contains elements of the Nehru vest, such as the collar and being sleeveless. However, it is shorter in length (at the waist, rather than at the hip), constructed from a thinner material, and lacks any lining or significant structure.
  • Where to buy your Nehru jerkin?

I have no idea. I collected mine from a handicrafts exhibition at Dastkar Bazaar in Chhatarpur, New Delhi.  And I have not been able to locate a stash of these in any other spot, though I am positive that some market has a mound of them. 
  • How to size and wear your Nehru jerkin?
Fashion no: Pair with a loose-fitting kurta shirt constructed from a billowy textile like raw cotton, raw cotton-silk, or raw linen – gahhhh no! These fabrics will balloon from the shoulder blades since the vest itself is thin and body-hugging. The final look will be costumey – gahhhhh.


Fashion yes: Pair with a thin and tight-fitting top, such as a short sleeved t-shirt or a long-sleeved thermal.  The final look will be sleek.


khaathletic 
(khaadi +athletic)

Nehru jerkin is khaadi wool in burgundy purchased from Dastkar Bazaar in Chhatarpur, New Delhi; Top is three-quarter length t-shirt in grey cotton-polyester blend by Union brand purchased from Marshall’s in Chicago; glasses are plastic with black-to-grey-to-clear shaded lenses by Marc Jacobs purchased from duty-free shop at Charles de Gaulle International Airport, Paris; pants are denim in black by Naked & Famous brand purchased from Sydney’s on Queen Street West, Toronto; Shoes are suede in tannish brown by Cafeina brand purchased from chain store in Genova (Italy)


kurta pant


Before men in the West began experimenting with different pant styles – straight, skinny, boot-cut, flared, bell-bottoms, and so on – South Asian men had already been donning a huge variety of kurta pants. These pants are prefixed with ‘kurta’ since they are designed to be paired with kurta tops.  Styles range from the humble dhoti, to more straight and tailored cuts like the trouser or Punjabi kurta, to more playful styles the calf-hugging churidar, the balloon-thigh jodhpuri, and the gargantuan girigauri.  Throw caution to the wind and don a playful kurta pant!  Though, to avoid appearing you are in costume, pair your adventurous kurta pants with a top that is conservative; something monochromatic and fitted.   


khippy 
(khadi + hippy)

Left: vendor at Dilli Haat in INA, New Delhi wearing dhoti pants, thigh-length kurta top, and turban all in white cotton, Nehru jerkin in brown wool, and Rajasthani jouti shoes in brown leather
 
Right: T-shirt is tri-blend of polyester-cotton-rayon in heather grey by B/2 brand purchased from Marshall’s in Washington DC; Churidar pants are cotton in white purchased by my lovely mom in some mad market of Lucknow; Kholapuri sandals are leather in brown purchased from Janpath in New Delhi; Stole of Assam khaadi raw silk in terracotta purchased from Dilli Haat in INA, New Delhi



khaadi neckwear


India’s neckwear during Fall and Winter ranges from the small muffler, to the medium-sized stole, and the large shawl. Since mufflers have a short length and narrow width, they are very elegant when adorned in the classic loop.  Mufflers pair well with dressy and dress-casual Western attire like collared shirts, suit blazers, and sweater vests.  Stoles are longer in length, and thus you can innovate with their shape and volume.  Stoles are wonderful for casual attire and for achieving the hippy look.  Shawls are longest in length and largest in width, and there are a thousand ways to don these.  Along with three other friends – two who are PhD students at Jawaharlal Nehru University and the third who is from Montreal and conducting research work on microfinance in rural Punjab – we played around with an Arabic look; engulfing our heads and faces in pools of gorgeous wool, as pictured below.



muffler

Muffler of khaadi yak wool in brown and black purchased from Himachal Bhavan at Dilli Haat, INA, New Delhi


stole

stole of Assam khaadi raw silk in terracotta purchased from Dilli Haat, INA, New Delhi


shawl

shawls of wool borrowed from two lovely PhD candidates at Jawaharlal Nehru University